Is self-employment self-help?

Disgruntled and supportive jobseeker here who has had enough of possibly being misunderstood. Exploited, with the potential of good intentions, is a word I want to include too but it feels a bit too much.

Blogging is something I haven’t done for a while and I’m sorry for coming back to moan but I have a few thoughts to share. Thoughts on self-employment and employment. I’ve wanted to help disadvantaged people to build confidence and find work from the start of 2013 but, from two pieces of employment advice I’ve received, I feel I’ve damaged my own chances of finding work. I’ve been called a “nice guy” by a manager I know well who said he only couldn’t employ me because I didn’t have experience of a managerial role. Before instead employing a trainee.

What is this magical experience stuff so many employers want but, in my experience, don’t offer? Why am I losing sleep over unemployment if, apparently, the unemployment rate is still dropping? Would volunteering or taking low pay for an apprenticeship mean I’m employed? Another number in the employed total? Will saying how I feel go against me? Continue reading

Why are we riled over Rifkind and scorned over Straw?

Self-employment presents an opportunity to showcase a skill or actively raise awareness of a personal passionate subject. It is a chance to try and make a difference for yourself and others on your own terms.

Self-employment is also a way to earn a living. For those who haven’t been given a chance by an employer to build a career or find steady work, it is an opportunity to do something that brings joy. It is a way to escape the dole queue. It is an alternative to zero-hour contracts. It may be a reason unemployment figures in Great Britain have dropped from 2.68 million in October 2011 to 1.86 million in December 2014.

As Channel 4’s Dispatches revealed on Monday 23rd February 2015, Sir Malcolm Rifkind MP and Jack Straw MP are making a financial gain by being self-employed as public speakers. Using secret cameras to capture conversations, investigative journalists posed as representatives of a PMR, a fake Hong Kong-based business, in seeking to find out if Sir Malcolm and Jack would work for them on a consultancy basis. If this opportunity had been genuine, they may have both made a profit but they would have benefited PMR in sharing experiences and contacts.

Sir Malcolm and Jack could have helped out. They have, however, been lauded for their actions. Sir Malcolm has announced he will resign as a Member of Parliament (MP) at the British general election in May 2015. I feel for them both and want to find the reason for negativity. Should an MP only work for their constituents? Is it greed? Continue reading